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Sulfurous Samadhi:
Table of Contents
Intro
Chemistry
History
Stolaroff Survey
Hardison's Survey
User Survey
Pharmacology
Legal
Conclusion

Appendices:
User Quotes:
2C-T-2
2C-T-7
Comparisons

Synthesis:
  • 2C-T-2
  • 2C-T-7

    Product Lit:
  • 2C-T-2
  • Blue Mystic 1
  • Blue Mystic 2
  • Retailer Note
  • Bibliography


  • Sulfurous Samadhi
    2C-T-2 & 2C-T-7 User Surveys
    by Murple, Feb 6, 2001





    Originally, I had intended to simply analyze available first-hand experience reports to get a general picture of the effects of 2C-T-2 and 2C-T-7 for this paper. After some thought and discussing the difficulties involved with Earth of Erowid, I wrote up Internet based survey forms which Erowid agreed to host on their web site. Two surveys were made, one for each drug. They asked the same 27 question forms, and each survey was crosslinked to the other so that people who had tried both drugs could easily find and answer both surveys. Questions were designed to study several aspects of these drugs. First was to form a demographic picture of users - for example age, sex, weight, medical condition. Second was to study the logistics of use - dose, route of administration, and frequency. Users were asked several questions each about side effects and aftereffects, and were given a chance to make general comments about the drugs.

    The survey software and results (with submitters' email and IP addresses removed) will be made available through Erowid in the future for further analysis. The surveys were put online September 17, 2000 and ran until December 1, 2000. Announcements were made on various Internet drug forums and mailing lists.

    Due to the anonymous nature of submissions, this survey should not be considered to be scientific. Surveys were all reviewed in an effort to remove invalid submissions. All responses considered invalid were archived and taken out of the analysis. Some surveys were modified slightly to be easier for the software to read, but all original versions were archived. Some people sent in two surveys, one intended to replace the other. These people's first submissions were archived as well, as were accidental duplicate submissions.

    After the removal of unusable submissions, there were 423 valid responses to the 2C-T-7 survey and 43 valid responses to the 2C-T-2 survey. It is unfortunate that there were not more responses to the 2C-T-2 survey, as the ten-fold difference in sample sizes makes comparisons between the two drugs somewhat less conclusive than what was hoped for.

    Demographics



    The age range of 2C-T-2 users was 16 to 47 years old, with the average age being 27. One respondent did not list their age. The age range for 2C-T-7 users was 14 to 64 years old, with the average being 24. Four of the 2C-T-7 users did not list their age.

    The weight range for 2C-T-2 users was 110 to 270 pounds (50 to 122 kilograms), with the average being 164 pounds (74 kilograms). One respondent did not give their weight. For the 2C-T-7 users, the weight range was 85 to 330 pounds (39 to 150 kilograms) with the average being 166 pounds (75 kilograms). Four of the 2C-T-7 respondents did not give their weight.

    For both drugs, the overwhelming majority of the respondents were male. In the case of 2C-T-2, 39 respondents (90.70%) were male and 4 (9.30%) were female. Of the 2C-T-7 users, 378 (89.36%) were male, 42 (9.93%) were female, and 3 (0.71%) did not give their sex.

    Medical Conditions



    Respondents were asked to list any pre-existing conditions they may have, including any medications they take. A wide range of medical conditions was listed. Respondents also took a variety of medications which will be discussed later in the section on drug combinations.

    Among the 2C-T-2 users, people reported ADD/ADHD, affective disorder, allergies of various kinds (severe enough to require medication, in some cases), anxiety disorder, asthma, bipolar disorder, and hypertension. One respondent indicated that he was addicted to GHB.

    The 2C-T-7 users reported quite a few more conditions, owing to the much larger sample size. These included ADD/ADHD, affective disorder, allergies, anxiety disorder, arteriosclerosis, asthma, autozymal tremors, back pain, bipolar disorder, clinical depression, Crohn's disease, insulin dependent diabetes, and endometriosis. One reported having a heart murmur which doctors had ruled "of no medical concern." Moving down the list, other reported conditions included high cholesterol, hypertension, migraines, osteoporosis, rheumatic arthritis, a history of seizures, and stomach ulcers.

    Routes of Ingestion



    In so far as routes of ingestion, 39 (90.70%) of the 2C-T-2 users reported having tried the drug orally, with 36 (83.72%) indicating this as their usual route. 10 respondents (23.26%) had tried taking it via insufflation, and 7 (16.28%) indicated this was their usual way of taking the drug.

    The 2C-T-7 users appeared to be more adventurous by comparison. 343 of them (81.09%) said they had tried the drug orally, with 288 (68.09%) indicating this as their usual way of taking it. 200 (47.28%) had tried it via insufflation, with 118 (27.90%) indicating it as their usual route. 38 respondents (8.98%) had tried smoking the drug, with 12 (2.84%) saying it was their usual way of using the drug. 7 users (1.65%) had tried it rectally, with 5 (1.18%) indicating that this was their usual route. 7 respondents (1.65%) stated that they had tried the drug in either an intramuscular or subcutaneous injection, and 3 users (0.70%) tried intravenous injection, but none of the users indicated injection was their usual way of taking it. One user who tried it indicated that injection was a bad idea because the material is not very soluble.

    Dosages



    The typical doses used by those taking 2C-T-2 orally ranged from 5 mg to 40 mg, with the average being 20.76 mg. For those who snort the drug, the typical doses ranged from 2.5 mg to 35 mg, with the average being 13.07 mg.

    For 2C-T-7, the typical oral doses ranged from 1 mg to 125 mg, with the average being 26.64 mg. Twelve of those who said their usual way of taking 2C-T-7 was orally did not give a typical dose. It should be noted that the user who listed 125 mg as their typical dose was a one time user who took this amount accidentally due to a weighing error. For those who indicated insufflation as their usual route, typical doses ranged from 0.5 mg to 50 mg, with the average being 14.98 mg. Eight of the insufflating users did not indicate their typical dosages. Of those who said they usually take the drug rectally, typical dosages ranged from 7 mg to 33 mg, with the average being 15 mg. Typical doses used by those who smoke the drug ranged from 1 mg to 40 mg, with 12 mg being the average. One of the respondents who usually smokes the drug did not give a typical dose.

    Overall, users of 2C-T-2 were fairly certain that their dose measurements were accurate. 21 respondents (48.84%) said they were very certain of their dose and 18 (41.86%) said they were pretty certain. By contrast, 3 respondents (6.98%) indicated they were not very certain of their dose, and only 1 (2.33%) responded "Who knows?" to this question. When considering routes of administration, the oral users were more certain of their doses than those who snort the drug. 19 (52.78%) of the oral users were very certain of their dose, 16 (44.44%) were pretty certain, and one (2.78%) responded "Who knows?" In contrast 2 of the insufflating users (28.57%) were very certain of their dose, another 2 (28.57%) were pretty certain, and 3 (42.86%) were not very certain.

    Turning to the 2C-T-7 users, there was somewhat less sureness about dosage measurement. Overall, 149 respondents (35.22%) were very certain of their dose, 180 (42.55%) were pretty certain, 62 (14.66%) were not very certain, 31 (7.33%) responded "Who knows?" and 1 person (0.24%) did not respond to the question. As with 2C-T-2, when the route of administration is taken into consideration, the picture changes sharply. Of those who usually take 2C-T-7 orally, 124 (43.06%) were very certain of their dose, 115 (39.93%) were pretty certain, 30 (10.42%) were not very certain, and 19 (6.60%) were very unsure. Of those who usually snort the drug, 21 (17.80%) were very certain of their dose, 57 (48.31%) were pretty certain, 30 (25.42%) were not very certain, and 10 (8.47%) were not certain at all. Of the rectal users, 1 (20%) was very certain of dosage accuracy, 2 (40%) were pretty certain, and another 2 (40%) were not very certain. Finally, out of those who normally smoke their 2C-T-7, 3 (25.00%) were very certain of their dose, 6 (50%) were pretty certain, 2 (16.67%) responded "Who knows?" and 1 (8.33%) did not answer this question.

    Usage Patterns



    The 2C-T-2 users indicated that they had used the drug between 1 and 20 times, with the average being 3.69 times. Users were asked to give the month and year of the first time they had taken it and the last time they had taken it. Elapsed time between the two dates ranged from none in the case of one-time users to two and a half years, with the average being around five months.

    The 2C-T-7 users responded that they had taken the drug between 1 and 200 times, with the average being 4.78 times. One respondent did not respond to this question. Elapsed time between first and last uses ranged from none to four years, with the average being around two and a half months. Five respondents did not indicate the timespan of their use.

    In the case of the user who had taken 2C-T-7 200 times, it should be pointed out that he was not using it as a psychedelic but rather as a nootropic. The respondent was a 43 year old male who said that he had "ingested almost 2 grams of 2CT7 over a 7 month period," taking "a daily +1 museum dosage of 5-10 mg." No tolerance was noticed. He said "I found it to be one of the most powerful cognition enhancers I've ever encountered," but mentioned that "it was difficult to stop taking 2CT7 and I used a SSRI to regain seratonin balance." Discussing the long term effects this has had on him, he says "the introspective and emotionally beneficial aspects of 2CT7 have allowed me to develop and appreciate my relationships with people. 2CT7 has also helped to remove personal obstacles that have prohibited progress in my life."

    When asked about frequency of use, 1 (2.33%) of the 2C-T-2 users indicated weekly use, 9 (20.93%) indicated they used it two to three times per month, 2 (4.65%) indicated they took it monthly, 5 (11.63%) said they took it every two months, 5 (11.63%) that they took it twice per year, and 13 (30.23%) that they took it yearly or less. 5 respondents (11.63%) did not respond to the question.

    Turning to the 2C-T-7 users, 16 (3.78%) indicated that they had used it more than once a week. 33 (7.80%) indicated that they used it weekly. 77 (18.20%) said they used it two to three times per month. 84 (19.86%) indicated monthly use. 32 (7.57%) said they used it every two months. 27 (6.38%) replied that they used it twice per year. 102 (24.11%) said they used it yearly or less. 36 (8.51%) did not answer this question.

    Willingness to Repeat



    Most of the 2C-T-2 users indicated a desire to repeat the experience. Overall, 24 (55.81%) of them said they would repeat it at the same dose. 11 (25.58%) said they would like to take a higher dose. 1 (2.33%) indicated a desire to repeat the experience, but at a lower dose. Only 3 (6.98%) did not want to repeat the experience, and 4 (9.30%) were undecided. When taking routes of consumption into consideration, the picture changes. Of those who used it orally, 22 (61.11%) said they would repeat it at the same dose. 7 (19.44%) expressed a desire to take more, 1 (2.78%) said they would take less. 3 (8.33%) did not want to repeat the experience, and another 3 (8.33%) were unsure. Out of those who snort it, 2 (28.57%) would repeat it at the same dose, 4 (57.14%) wanted to try a larger dose, and 1 (14.29%) was unsure about repeating the experience. When asked why they would choose not to take 2C-T-2 again, 6 people referred to the side effects, and one person said he simply found it not up to his expectations, preferring other of the sulfur-containing phenethylamines.

    Overall, the 2C-T-7 seemed slightly more eager to repeat the experience. 203 (47.99%) said they would repeat it at the same dose, 126 (29.79%) wanted to take more, and 22 (5.20%) would repeat it but at a lower dose. 21 (4.96%) said they did not want to take it again, and 40 (9.46%) were undecided. 11 respondents (2.60%) did not answer this question. Again, routes of administration were a big factor. Of the oral users, 129 (44.79%) said they would like to take it again at the same dose, 97 (33.68%) would like to take more, and 13 (4.51%) would like to try a smaller dose. 10 (3.47%) said they did not want to take it again, and 29 (10.07%) were unsure if they would repeat it. 10 (3.47%) of the oral users did not answer this question. Of those who snort the drug, 66 (55.93%) expressed an interest in taking it again at the same dose, 22 (18.64%) would like to try a higher dose, and 8 (6.78%) would repeat it at a lower dose. 11 (9.32%) were not interested in doing it again, 10 (8.47%) were uncertain, and 1 (0.84%) did not answer this question. 4 (80%) of the rectal users said they would take it again at the same dose, and 1 (20%) would take a higher dose. Of the smokers, 4 (3.33%) would repeat it at the same dose, 6 (50.00%) would like to try a higher dose, 1 (8.33%) would repeat at a lower dose, and 1 (8.33%) was undecided.

    The 2C-T-7 users had a wider range of reasons for not wishing to use it again. Eleven people indicated that they found 2C-T-7 weak or uninteresting, or just preferred other drugs. Around 20 indicated that the side effects outweighed the positive effects for them. Eight people remarked that they had tried snorting it and that the pain of that experience was enough to put them off. Six people made comments about the comedown or aftereffects being unpleasant. Nine people said they found the trip too intense for their tastes. Five people said they wanted to see more research done, or had concerns about the drug's safety. Other reasons given included the length of the effects, price, or inconsistent effects.

    Side Effects



    Both drugs produced a range of physical side effects. Out of all the 2C-T-2 users, 8 (18.60%) reported the side effects were barely noticable. 11 (25.58%) found them to be mild and of short duration. 10 (23.26%) found them short but distracting, and 5 (11.63%) found them to be short but severe. 3 users (6.98%) found the side effects lasted a long time but were mild. 5 (11.63%) found them long and distracting. 1 person (2.33%) did not respond to this question. When looking only at users who take the drug orally, 4 (11.11%) found the side effects were barely noticable. 10 (27.78%) found that the side effects were short and mild, 9 (25.00%) found them to be short but distracting, 5 (13.89%) found them short and severe, 3 (8.33%) reported mild but long lasting side effects, and 4 (11.11%) found them long and distracting. 1 of the oral users (2.78%) did not respond. Of the insufflators, 4 (57.14%) found the side effects barely noticable. 1 person (14.29%) found them short and mild, 1 (14.29%) found them short and distracting, and 1 (14.29%) found them long and distracting. I suspect these figures may be highly unreliable, as the sample size of people who snort 2C-T-2 is only 7 individuals. Given a larger sample size I believe that the side effects would be more pronounced for insufflation than for oral use, as is the case with 2C-T-7.

    Out of all the 2C-T-7 users, 62 (14.66%) found the side effects to be barely noticable. 121 (28.61%) found the side effects to be short and mild. 105 (24.82%) found them to be short and distracting. 34 (8.04%) found the side effects to be short but severe. 53 respondents (12.53%) found the side effects mild but long lasting. 29 (6.86%) found them to be long and distracting. 8 (2.60%) found the side effects to be long lasting and severe. 11 people (2.60%) did not indicate the level of side effects intensity. When comparing different routes of consumption, there are some rather big differences. Oral administration seems to have the mildest level of side effects, with 49 people (17.01%) reporting them as barely noticable. 87 respondents (30.21%) reported the side effects as short and mild. 66 (22.92%) said the side effects were distracting but short, and 18 (6.25%) said they were short but severe. 33 people (11.46%) said the side effects were long and mild, 20 (6.94%) said they were long and distracting, and 6 (2.08%) found them long and severe. 9 (3.13%) of the oral users did not rate the intensity of side effects. People who snort 2C-T-7 had a significantly worse time. 12 (10.17%) found them to be barely noticable. 28 (23.73%) found the side effects short but mild. 33 (27.97%) found them to be short and distracting, and 15 (12.71%) found them to be short and severe. 17 people (14.41%) found the side effects to be long but mild, 9 (7.63%) found them long and distracting, and 2 (1.69%) found them to be long and severe. 2 (1.69%) of the insufflators did not answer this question. Of the rectal users, 2 (40%) found the side effects to be short and mild, 2 (40%) found them short and distracting, and 1 (20%) found them long and mild. Of those who smoke 2C-T-7, 1 (8.33%) said the side effects were barely noticable. 4 (33.33%) found them short and mild, 4 (33.33%) said they were short and distracting, 1 (8.33%) said the side effects were short but severe, and 2 (16.67%) found them long but mild.

    Nausea was the most common side effect of 2C-T-2, being reported by 26 (60.47%) of all users. Broken down by route, 23 (63.89%) of oral users and 3 (42.86%) of insufflating users reported nausea. Nausea was also the most common side effect for 2C-T-7, with 265 (62.65%) of all users reporting it. Broken down by route, 180 (62.50%) of oral users, 76 (64.41%) of insufflating users, 3 (60%) of rectal users and 6 (50%) of smokers experienced nausea.

    Vomiting was reported by 10 (23.26%) of all 2C-T-2 users. By route, 8 (22.22%) of the oral and 2 (28.57%) of the insufflating users reported that they threw up. 2C-T-7 gave somewhat worse results, with 129 (30.50%) of all users vomiting. By route, oral users fared much better, with 77 (26.74%) throwing up, compared to 45 (38.14%) of insufflating users, 2 (40.00%) of rectal users, and 5 (41.67%) of the smokers.

    For both drugs, muscle tension was the second most common side effect. Of all 2C-T-2 users, 14 (32.56%) experienced it. By route, 12 (33.33%) of oral users and 2 (28.57%) of insufflating users reported muscle tension. Again, 2C-T-7 gave noticably worse results, with 197 (46.57%) of all users reporting muscle tension. By route, 141 (48.96%) of oral users, 47 (39.83%) of insufflating users, 3 (60%) of rectal users, and 6 (50%) of smokers reported muscle tension. Many people pointed out that this muscle tension was focused in the neck and shoulders. A few people indicated it occurred primarily during the early part of the trip.

    Out of all 2C-T-2 users, 8 (18.60%) reported diarrhea. Of the oral users, 7 (19.44%) reported diarrhea, as did 1 (14.29%) of the insufflating users. For 2C-T-7 users this seemed to be less common, with only 26 (6.15%) of all users reporting diarrhea. By route, 18 (6.25%) of oral users, 5 (4.24%) of insufflating users, and 3 (25%) of 2C-T-7 smokers reported diarrhea.

    Tachycardia was reported by 7 (16.28%) of all 2C-T-2 users - all of whom had taken it orally, making the percentage of oral users reporting it 19.44%. For 2C-T-7, 92 (21.75%) of all users experienced tachycardia. Broken down by route, 60 (20.83%) of oral users, 29 (24.57%) of insufflating users, and 3 (25%) of smokers reported tachycardia.

    Hypertension was reported by 1 2C-T-2 user, who took it orally, making the percentage of all users experiencing this effect 2.33%, or 2.78% of oral users. Again, 2C-T-7 did somewhat worse, with 25 (5.91%) of all 2C-T-7 users reporting hypertension. By route, 16 (5.55%) of oral users, 8 (6.78%) of insufflating users, and 1 (8.33%) of smokers reporting it.

    Dehydration was reported by 7 (16.28%) of 2C-T-2 users. Of those taking it orally, 6 (16.67%) reported dehydration, as did 1 (14.29%) of the insufflating users. 2C-T-7 gave similar results, with 76 (17.96%) of respondents reporting dehydration. By route, 53 (18.40%) of oral users, 20 (16.95%) of insufflating users, and 3 (25%) of smokers reported dehydration.

    Headaches were fairly uncommon for 2C-T-2 users, with 4 (9.30%) users reporting them. These users all took it orally, making the occurrence of headaches with oral use 11.11%. Here, 2C-T-7 gave dramatically worse results. 135 (31.91%) of 2C-T-7 users reported headaches. By route, 92 (31.94%) of oral users, 36 (30.51%) of insufflating users, 2 (40%) of rectal users, and 5 (41.67%) of smokers got headaches. Several people commented that the headache seemed to come most often near the end of the experience, and some felt they may be due to dehydration. One person described the headache as "brain-freezesque" feeling. Another said that the headache was accompanied by a very intense buzzing pressure in the sides of his head.

    Both drugs also caused various other side effects.

    Of all 2C-T-2 users, 7 (16.28%) - all oral users, making up 19.44% of that group - reported other side effects. Side effects reported included a stomach ache, nasal congestion (in someone who took the drug orally), and a tingling pins-and-needles sensation in the extremities. One person reported feeling an unusual sensual arousal without any apparent external cause. One person reported confusion.

    With 2C-T-7, 118 (27.90%) of all users reported other side effects. By route, 72 (25%) of oral users, 42 (35.59%) of insufflating users, 1 (20%) of rectal users and 3 (25%) of smokers reported miscellaneous side effects.

    Most commonly reported were various body temperature related effects. People reported feeling cold, while others reported feeling hot. Some reported alternating sensations of hot and cold. One person said they could not tell if they were hot or cold. Several people reported an increase in sweating - one person described it as "extreme sweating." It seems possible that these temperature effects are perceived rather than actual, however. One person who felt feverish got out a thermometer and discovered that they had a normal 98.6 Farenheit temperature.

    In addition to nausea, 2C-T-7 users reported other gastrointestinal side effects. Two people reported stomach cramps. A few reported symptoms of gas, including belching and flatulence. As noted earlier, one person felt the nausea induced by this drug is caused at least in part by gas. One person reported heartburn. One reported indigestion. Another reported consistently getting constipation for a day and a half every time he used it. One other person wrote that he experienced a "reduction in sphincter retention ability."

    Four people reported tremors, combined with a loss of manual dexterity in one case. Another person reported muscle spasms in the extremities in the initial phase of the experience. One person reported an eye twitch. Trisma, or jaw clenching, was reported by several people. One reported joint pain. Some people experience confusion or delirium with large doses of 2C-T-7. Sensory overload was also mentioned with large doses. Some people reported periods of dizziness or loss of balance. One person reported hearing rubbing noises in the ears, another reported a temporary reduction in hearing ability. One person reported decreased salivation, another reported increased salivation. One individual who had taken it orally reported nasal congestion. One person reported persistent dry eyes. One reported a numbness in the right side of their body. Another mentioned a persistent feeling of the need to urinate. One person reported extreme sexual arousal and desire. Another reported trouble ejaculating, but speculated that could be due to some MDMA he had also taken. One person reported heart palpitations. One remarked on an amplified awareness of pains and itches. One person felt irritable. One person reported a pins-and-needles tingle in the extremities. One person who snorted what he called "an idiotic dose" of 20 to 26 mg reported that he passed out.

    When asked whether the level of side effects had changed with repeated use of the drugs, users of both drugs gave similar answers. 13 (30.23%) of 2C-T-2 users reported no change, 1 (2.33%) reported an increase, 4 (9.30%) reported a decrease, and 4 (9.30%) reported that the level of side effects varied from experience to experience. 21 users did not respond, either because they have not used 2C-T-2 more than once or because they simply chose not to answer. Of 2C-T-7 users, 136 (32.15%) reported no change in the level of side effects, 10 (2.36%) reported an increase, 51 (12.06%) reported a decrease, and 57 (13.48%) reported that the level of side effects is variable. 169 (39.95%) of the 2C-T-7 users did not answer this question.

    People tried a variety of things in attempts to prevent or treat the side effects they experienced. Both 2C-T-2 and 2C-T-7 users tried many of the same things, so responses for both drugs will be summarized together.

    Some approaches involved dietary changes. Fasting prior to taking the drugs was reported to help for the nausea. One person suggested not eating, but drinking plenty of water to prevent dry heaves. Other suggested a light snack helped prevent side effects. The survey included a question which asked respondents to indicate whether they had eaten before taking the drugs, but due to a technical glitch this question did not appear on the survey for a few days, and thus was not asked of all participants. Of the 2C-T-2 users, 30 were asked this question. Out of these 30, 11 (36.67%) took the drug on an empty stomach, and 19 (63.33%) took it after a light meal. Out of the 2C-T-7 users, 326 were asked this question. Of those, 152 (46.63%) took the drug on an empty stomach, 138 (42.33%) took it after a light meal, 29 (8.90%) took it after a heavy meal, and 7 (2.15%) did not respond to the question.

    Of those who took 2C-T-2 on an empty stomach, 2 (18.18%) reported the side effects of the drug were barely noticable. 3 (27.27%) found the side effects short and mild. 4 (36.36%) found them short but distracting. 1 (9.09%) found them long and distracting. 1 (9.09%) did not specify the intensity of side effects. Out of the people who took 2C-T-2 after a light meal, 5 (26.32%) found the side effects to be barely noticable. 6 (31.58%) found them short and mild. 3 (15.79%) found them to be short but distracting. 1 (5.26%) found them short but severe. 2 (10.53%) found them long but mild, and 2 (10.53%) found them long and distracting. Due to the small sample size, these numbers are probably not very useful.

    A clearer picture of the relation between an empty stomach and intensity of side effects can be seen with the 2C-T-7 responses, and it seems that the less food the user has in their stomach, the milder the side effects will be. Of those who took 2C-T-7 on an empty stomach, 23 (15.13%) reported the side effects were barely noticable. 49 (32.24%) reported they were short and mild. 36 (23.68%) reported short but distracting side effects, 11 (7.24%) reported short but severe side effects, 19 (12.50%) reported long but mild side effects, 8 (5.26%) reported long and distracting side effects, and 6 (3.95%) did not indicate the level of side effects they experienced. Those who took 2C-T-7 after a light meal fared a little worse, with 21 (15.22%) reporting the side effects as barely noticable, 35 (25.36%) reporting them as short and mild, 41 (29.71%) reporting short but distracting side effects, 11 (7.97%) reporting short but severe side effects, 19 (13.77%) reporting them as long but mild, 4 (2.90%) long and distracting, and 5 (3.62%) as long and severe. 2 (1.45%) did not indicate the intensity of side effects. The people who took 2C-T-7 after a heavy meal did significantly worse. Only 2 (6.90%) reported the side effects were barely noticable. 11 (37.93%) said the side effects were short but mild. Short but distracting side effects were reported by 3 (10.34%) of them, as were short and severe side effects and long mild side effects. Long and distracting side effects were reported by 6 (20.70%) of them. 1 (3.45%) did not indicate the level of side effects experienced.

    Other approaches to reducing side effects involved various techniques such as deep breathing and other relaxation methods. Going for walks was recommended by one user for both nausea and muscle tension. Taking the drug in divided doses spaced out over an hour or so was recommended by some. One user wisely suggested simply taking low enough doses to get the consciousness altering effects but without the full blown side effects, sacrificing intensity for comfort.

    Many users reported using other substances to treat side effects. Marijuana was used widely to treat nausea and muscle tension as well as to relax and enhance the experience. GHB, opiates, and benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax were also used to try and reduce muscle tension and anxiety - all with fairly good results, except for two users who reported that opiates increased their nausea. One person reported trying Gravol, an anti-nausea medication, with no success. One user tried Pepto Bismol and reported that it "works wonders." Another tried a mixture of baking soda and water, saying it helped calm the stomach for some time. One user who reported excessive nasal congestion said that vapor rub worked. Magnesium supplements were taken by one user to treat muscle tension. One person remarked that the nausea seemed to be caused in part by gas, and tried treating it with Tagamet - successfully.

    Drug Combinations



    People mixed a wide range of drugs with 2C-T-2 and 2C-T-7, for purposes ranging from medical need, to remedies or preventatives for the side effects of the drug, to enhancing or modifying the trip, to trying to sleep afterwards. Most people made no remarks about the effects the combination produced, if any. The few who did made only minor comments. In all, there were no dangerous reactions. Some who tried mixing different psychedelics reported the effects as overwhelming and frightening. Some found that alcohol and opiates increased their nausea.

    2C-T-2 users tried combining the drug with a handful of other psychedelics, including 2C-T-7, 2C-B, 5-MeO-DMT, DMT, DOB, DPT, LSD, MDMA, mescaline, and psilocybin-containing mushrooms. Some tried mixing it with ketamine. Some reported using nitrous oxide during the trip. The piperazines BZP and TFMPP were combined with 2C-T-2. Cannabis was smoked during the trip. Sedative drugs tried with 2C-T-2 were alcohol, blue lotus (Nymphaea caerulea), clonazepam (Klonopin), GHB and GBL, and opium. Prescription drugs used by 2C-T-2 users were Claritin-D (containing pseudoephedrine and loratadine), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), pemoline (Cylert), sertraline (Zoloft) and venlafaxine (Effexor). One respondent indicated taking St. John's wort.

    2C-T-7 users listed quite a few more drugs, owing to the larger sample size of the group. The list of psychedelics taken with it is fairly extensive: 2C-T-2, 2C-B, 4-acetoxy-DIPT, 5-MeO-DIPT, 5-MeO-DMT, AMT, DIPT, DMT, DPT, LSD, MDA, MDMA, mescaline, morning glory seeds, and psilocybin-containing mushrooms. Two people tried combining it with Amanita muscaria, and several reported smoking Salvia divinorum during the trip. Both ketamine and PCP were tried with 2C-T-7. Dextromethorphan was tried by quite a few people, with mixed results. Nitrous oxide was also a very popular combination, and reportedly a very successful one. The piperazines BZP and TFMPP were combined with 2C-T-7... interestingly, it was reported that BZP seemed to reduce the side effects of the 2C-T-7. A few people tried cocaine during the trip, and others tried a handful of other stimulants including methamphetamine, methcathinone, ephedrine, as well as prescription mixed amphetamine salts (Adderal). Caffeine was reported by two people to produce noticably strong stimulant effects including tachycardia. Cannabis was used successfully by many to treat nausea, to relax, and to enhance the trip. People tried several opiates as well, including codeine, heroin, hydrocodone, opium, and oxycodone. Results were mixed, with two of the oxycodone users reporting it worsened their nausea. GHB, GBL, and 1,4-butanediol all were tried, in many cases as a treatment for tension and anxiety - for which they seemed successful. Other sedative drugs tried were alcohol, alprazolam (Xanax), and diazepam (Valium). One person tried ether, and said it "totally ruined" his trip. Two sleep aids were tried, zaleplon (Sonata) and zolpidem (Ambien) - interestingly, both of these respondents indicated getting strong visual effects from the combinations. The person who took Ambien described the effect as "very very very amazing visuals in a slowly losing consciousness sort of way." Someone tried dimenhydrinate (Dramamine) for nausea, and as mentioned before cimetidine (Tagamet) was also employed for gaseous nausea. One person tried using the nootropic piracetam to potentiate 2C-T-7 with no luck. Turning to medicinal drugs, a variety of people took various psychiatric drugs: amitryptiline (Elavil), bupropion (Wellbutrin or Zyban), busiprone (Buspar), citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac), nefazodone (Serzone), nortryptiline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil) and trazodone. One person took mirtazapine (Remeron) and noted that he seemed to have unusually strong reactions to 2C-T-7 compared to his friends. For arthritis, Ledetrexate and azathioprine (Imuran) were listed. Several people took birth control pills, but only one specified what kind (Alesse 21). Two kinds of antibiotic were listed, minocycline and penicillin. A range of allergy and asthma medications were used, including albuterol (Ventolin), beclomethasone dipropionate (Vancenase), budesonide (Pulmicort), fexofenadine (Allegra), fluticasone (Flovent), terbutaline (Bricanyl), and theophylline. For hypertension, bisoprolol (Ziac), doxazosin (Cardura), fosinopril sodium (Monopril), and hydrochlorothiazide. For high cholesterol, atorvastatin (Lipitor). A person who gets migraines took rizatriptan (Maxalt), while another took sumatriptan (Imitrex). Two kinds of anticonvulsant were taken by respondents, divalproex sodium (Depakote) and gabapentin (Neurontin). The person who used Neurontin remarked that when he took it, it would make the effects of 2C-T-7 slower to come on than usual. For stomach disorders, the medications ranitidine (Zantac) and Donnatal (a low dose mixture of belladonna alkaloids and phenobarbital) were taken. The other two medications listed were insulin and the acne treatment isotretinoin (Accutane).

    Aftereffects



    Turning to aftereffects, defined as effects occurring anywhere from the day after up to a week from use, both drugs seem to have produced similar results. Overall, 15 (34.88%) of 2C-T-2 users reported no aftereffects. 9 (20.93%) reported noticable but neutral aftereffects. 6 (13.95%) of 2C-T-2 users reported mildly positive aftereffects, and 3 (6.98%) reported very positive aftereffects. 7 (16.28%) reported mild hangovers, and only 1 (2.33%) reported a bad hangover. When looked at by route, 13 (36.11%) of oral users reported no aftereffects. 6 (16.67%) reported neutral aftereffects. 5 (13.89%) of the oral users reported mildly positive aftereffects, and 2 (8.33%) reported very positive aftereffects. 7 (19.44%) reported a mild hangover, and 1 (2.78%) reported a bad hangover. 1 (2.78%) of the oral users did not respond to this question. Turning to the users who snort 2C-T-2, 2 (28.57%) reported no aftereffects, 3 (42.86%) reported neutral aftereffects, 1 (14.29%) reported mildly positive aftereffects, and 1 (14.29%) did not answer the question.

    In general, the aftereffects reported by 2C-T-2 users were similar to those from other psychedelic drugs. Six people reported feeling mentally or physically drained the next day. Three reported day-after headaches. One person reported having stomach pains for a few days, and one reported having mild gas and diarrhea when the drug was wearing off. One person reported lingering visual effects. Four people mentioned feelings of well being and mental clarity. One person reported feeling emotionally imbalanced, similar to that experienced after MDMA but shorter in duration. One person reported experiencing an "undefinable emotion lingering for some time afterward, deep and possibly sad but bound to joy, best word I can come up with is soulful - aware of connection to other feeling beings yet more in touch with individuality at same time, sometimes an OK lonliness leading myself to myself for companionship."

    Of all the 2C-T-7 users, 149 (35.22%) reported no aftereffects. 86 (20.33%) reported neutral aftereffects. 64 (15.13%) reported mildly positive aftereffects, and 32 (5.75%) reported very positive aftereffects. 65 (15.37%) reported mild hangovers, and 16 (3.78%) reported bad hangovers. 11 (2.60%) did not respond to the question. Broken down by routes of consumption, 107 (37.15%) of oral users reported no aftereffects, 51 (17.71%) reported neutral aftereffects, 48 (16.67%) reported mildly positive aftereffects, 18 (6.25%) reported very positive aftereffects, 45 (15.63%) reported a mild hangover, 11 (3.82%) reported a bad hangover, and 8 (2.78%) did not respond. Of those who snort 2C-T-7, 35 (29.66%) reported no aftereffects, 32 (27.12%) reported neutral aftereffects, 15 (12.71) reported mildly positive aftereffects, 12 (10.17%) reported very positive aftereffects, 17 (14.41%) reported a mild hangover, 5 (4.24%) reported a bad hangover, and 2 (1.69%) did not answer. Of the rectal users, 1 (20.00%) reported no hangover, 1 (20.00%) reported mildly positive aftereffects, 1 (20.00%) reported very positive aftereffects, and 2 (40.00%) reported a mild hangover. Finally, of those who smoke 2C-T-7, 6 (50.00%) reported no aftereffects, 3 (25.00%) reported neutral aftereffects, 1 (8.33%) reported very positive aftereffects, 1 (8.33%) reported a mild hangover, and 1 (8.33%) did not answer the question.

    Aftereffects reported by 2C-T-7 users were also very typical of the aftereffects produced by most psychedelics. Many users reported feelings of being mentally or physically exhausted. Some described these effects negatively, saying they felt drained or dazed. Just as many interpreted the effects positively however, saying they felt mellow and relaxed, even blissful. Some people reported that they felt energized after using 2C-T-7. Headaches, muscle aches, and stomach aches were reported frequently, but were generally mild. Many people compared the aftereffects of 2C-T-7 to the aftereffects of MDMA or LSD. In general, the aftereffects were mild, and even many of the people reporting exhaustion said that the aftereffects were milder than what they had experienced from other drugs.

    Mentally, many people reported feeling very positive following a 2C-T-7 experience. Feelings of well-being and optimism lasting for days and a lifting of depression and anxiety were reported by quite a few respondents. On the other hand, some users reported feelings of depression, anxiety and paranoia following a 2C-T-7 trip. Many people reported feeling intellectually slowed the day after using 2C-T-7. Memory lapses, disorientation, mild confusion, and an inability to concentrate were reported to last for a day or two. Interestingly, a few people reported the opposite, with one person noticing that they felt their vocabulary increased, and that they were less likely to hesitate and say things such as "erm..." between words.

    Lingering visual effects were reported by quite a few 2C-T-7 users. Increased perceptions of color and detail, minor distortions such as objects flickering or moving, and increased sensitivity to light were reported to last for up to several days by some people. In general, these effects were mild and in many cases considered a positive aftereffect.

    One woman wrote that her mentrual cycle was thrown off after using 2C-T-7, but pointed out that she had used the drug at the Burning Man Festival, and that her period could also have been affected by both the harsh desert environment and other drugs she took at the festival. One other person wrote that two women he had taken 2C-T-7 had their periods thrown off as well.

    When asked whether the level of aftereffects had changed with repeated use, 15 (34.88%) of 2C-T-2 users said it had not, 3 (6.98%) reported an increase, 2 (4.65%) reported a decrease, 3 (6.98%) reported that the level of aftereffects was variable, and 20 (46.51%) did not answer, either because they had not used 2C-T-2 more than once or did not choose to answer. With 2C-T-7, 166 (39.24%) reported no change in the level of aftereffects, 9 (2.13%) reported an increase, 23 (5.44%) reported a decrease, 50 (11.82%) reported aftereffects as being variable, and 175 (41.37%) did not respond.

    A few users mentioned things they had tried to reduce aftereffects. These included drinking sugary fruit juices toward the end of the trip, taking aspirin the next day, and taking the serotonin precursor 5-HTP.

    Quality Over Time



    When asked if the experience had changed with repeated use, 15 (34.88%) of the 2C-T-2 users reported that quality of the experience remained the same. 4 (9.30%) thought the quality increased with repeated use. 6 (13.95%) said that quality varied from experience to experience. 18 (41.86%) did not respond to this question, either because they had not used 2C-T-2 multiple times, or simply because they didn't feel like answering the question. Of the 2C-T-7 users, 100 (23.64%) felt that there was no change in quality, 58 (13.71%) felt the quality had increased, 13 (3.07%) felt it had decreased, and 101 (23.88%) thought it varied from experience to experience. 151 (35.70%) of the 2C-T-7 users did not respond to this question.

    Long Term Effects



    Finally, when asked how they felt these drugs had affected them in the long term, defined as effects lasting at least a week after use, 15 (34.88%) of the 2C-T-2 users felt the drug had no long term effect on them, 8 (18.60%) felt that they had received psychological or spiritual benefit from using it, and 20 (46.51%) did not answer the question. Of the 2C-T-7 users, 127 (30.02%) felt there were no long term effects from their use, 125 (29.55%) felt they had benefitted from the drug, 9 (2.13%) felt they had been psychologically or spiritually harmed by it, and only 6 (1.42%) felt they had been harmed in a physical organic way. 156 (36.88%) of the 2C-T-7 users did not answer this question. It is possible that the high percentages of users who did not answer this question may reflect the fact that many users have only used the drug for a few times over a short period, and perhaps they felt it was too early to tell what the lasting effects are. Of course, this is purely conjecture.

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